Toothbrushes Might Not Be Covered in Poo After All

If you’ve worried that your toothbrush, being usually in the same room as your toilet, is perpetually covered in microscopic fecal matter, well, here’s some relief. According to a new study, our brushes are full of bacteria found in our mouths, but they’re not full of bacteria from our guts. In other words, our toothbrushes don’t seem to be nearly as disgusting as many of us feared.

WFH Is Corroding Our Trust in Each Other

About a third of the employees of a regional bank have returned to working onsite, and the president holds a weekly all-staff town hall meeting by videoconference. Employees are encouraged to submit anonymous questions for him or other senior leaders to answer. For the past six weeks, an increasing number of people have asked, “How do we know if the people who are still working from home are actually working?” Some employees have even suggested specific technology-based monitoring approaches to track remote workers’ onscreen time and activities.

This deer had hair growing on its eyeballs, and it can also happen to us

As amazing as it often is, biology can be equally messed-up up at times.

In Tennessee, U.S., a whitetail deer was found ambling around the streets with a condition that made it appear as if it had hair growing on its eyeballs. Yes, you read that right.

Why So Many of Us Experience a Midlife Crisis

A mid-career crisis can happen to anyone. It can hit even those who objectively have the most fulfilling jobs. When it does, it inflicts pain on the individual suffering it and causes productivity losses for employers. Yet, the phenomenon remains stigmatized and under-researched, leaving crucial questions unanswered. What are the causes? Why does this malaise seem to strike in mid-life? And how can those who are stuck in its grips shake themselves loose?

Hong Kong warns air fryers can still pose the same health risks as traditional cooking methods

Hongkongers should be wary of marketing hype touting the health benefits of air fryers, the Consumer Council warned on Wednesday, noting that potentially cancer-causing compounds could still be created from preparing food with such products.

How a robotics engineer accidentally upended child labor practices in the Gulf

Before he found himself on the Al-Shahaniya racetrack on the outskirts of Doha, Esan Maruff had never seen a camel race. It was May 2005, and Maruff’s robotics team was on-site for a Qatar-funded research and development project — to make human jockeys obsolete by building a camel-racing robot. It was not a career pivot Maruff had seen coming. “The job was very much an accident,” he said. “I never applied. I never gave my resume to anyone.” 

Programmer has two guesses left to access £175m bitcoin wallet

Stefan Thomas has just two chances left to get his hands on his $240m (£175m) fortune.

Thomas is a San Francisco-based computer programmer, and a decade ago he was given 7,002 bitcoins as a reward for making a video explaining how the cryptocurrency works.

Read on…

Facial Hair Is Biologically Useless. So Why Do Humans Have It?

There are really only two types of facial hair: beards and mustaches. Every style of facial hair you’ve ever seen is one of these two, or a combination of both.

Think about it like part of a Linnaean taxonomy of human traits that we just made up but totally makes sense, where facial hair is a family, beards and mustaches are each a genus, and their many varieties are individual species that could interbreed, as it were, to create hybrid subspecies like the duck-billed platypus of the facial hair family, the soul patch.

Should I worry about an asteroid hitting Earth?

Every so often there are reports that an asteroid is passing close to Earth, with the most recent story claiming one the size of the Eiffel Tower will be zooming past our planet. Dinosaurs also famously became extinct after an asteroid collided with our planet 66 million years ago. But what is the likelihood of it happening again? 

Earth is spinning faster than it has for 50 years (and we might have to ‘subtract’ a second)

Earth is spinning unusually quickly – and last year saw the shortest day since people started counting.

In fact, 2020 saw the 28 shortest days since 1960, beating the previous shortest day in 2005, according to TimeandDate.com.