Does WFH lead to deep vein thrombosis? It’s not about sitting down but weight gain

With all the butt contact you’ve been making with your chair since work-from-home (WFH) arrangements began earlier this year, you might have wondered at some point: Are you at risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT)?

How to boost happiness hormones like serotonin and dopamine in everyday life

In this new normal (aka life in a pandemic) a few simple rituals always make me happy: that first sip of coffee, cuddles with my puppy, reading before work, and getting some exercise. I don’t think I’ve ever left a dance workout class in a bad mood. Now more than ever, I’m leaning into these small things that make a difference in my day. 

Brain and Nervous System: How Conditions Change Your Brain

When you go through something traumatic, your brain triggers a “flight-or-fight” response. Most people recover on their own, but some get posttraumatic stress disorder. PTSD causes your amygdala — the part of the brain that controls emotions — to be overactive. And it lowers activity in your prefrontal cortex, a decision-making area. It can also shrink your hippocampus, which forms memories.

Healthy Living: Health Hazards When You Don’t Wash Your Sheets

You spend a third of your life in bed. So clean bed linens should be one of your must-do chores. Think of the drool, sweat, dandruff, and other “stuff” you leave between the sheets. Ideally, you ought to launder them weekly, or at least every other week. But a recent survey found that Americans tend to be sheet slackers, going 25 days between washes.

The Simple Dutch Cure for Stress

In 2019 I was in San Francisco, a city known for its tech companies, steep hills, and fierce winds. Each day I’d run around the neighborhood and up through the park, ending with a spectacular view of the Golden Gate Bridge. Back in my AirBnB, I’d feel energized and refreshed, fingers tingling from the breeze. It was cold, exhausting, but completely exhilarating. 

There’s a Lot to Learn About How Blue Light Affects Our Eyes

Blue light’s rap sheet is growing ever longer. Researchers have connected the high-energy visible light, which emanates from both the sun and your cell phone (and just about every other digital device in our hands and on our bedside tables), to disruptions in the body’s circadian rhythms. And physicians have drawn attention to the relationship between our favorite devices and eye problems.