Fermented Foods Decrease Inflammation and Improve Gut Diversity, Study Finds

Eating a diet full of fermented foods, like yogurt, kimchi, and fermented vegetables, and consuming kombucha tea may be a way to reduce the inflammation that’s associated with chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic stress.

Read more…

The health benefits of coffee

NEW YORK — Americans sure love their coffee. Even last spring when the pandemic shut down New York, nearly every neighbourhood shop that sold takeout coffee managed to stay open, and I was amazed at how many people ventured forth to start their stay-at-home days with a favourite store-made brew.

Read more at https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/14/well/eat/coffee-health-benefits.html

Your Face: A Window Into Your Health

It’s been said that the eyes are a window to the soul. Your face is also a window—by looking closely at your facial features, you can read details of your own health. Sometimes looking into the mirror may show something surprising, even unsettling. But how can you know whether a facial change is cause for concern or something harmless?

Study of 1.6 million people looks at the effects of income on our emotional well-being

They say money can’t buy you happiness — but it appears that making more of it makes you feel much better about yourself. 

A new study published in the American Psychological Association journal Emotion looks at how a person’s income influences their “self-regard emotions,” aka their pride, confidence, shame, etc. 

Toothbrushes Might Not Be Covered in Poo After All

If you’ve worried that your toothbrush, being usually in the same room as your toilet, is perpetually covered in microscopic fecal matter, well, here’s some relief. According to a new study, our brushes are full of bacteria found in our mouths, but they’re not full of bacteria from our guts. In other words, our toothbrushes don’t seem to be nearly as disgusting as many of us feared.

Why So Many of Us Experience a Midlife Crisis

A mid-career crisis can happen to anyone. It can hit even those who objectively have the most fulfilling jobs. When it does, it inflicts pain on the individual suffering it and causes productivity losses for employers. Yet, the phenomenon remains stigmatized and under-researched, leaving crucial questions unanswered. What are the causes? Why does this malaise seem to strike in mid-life? And how can those who are stuck in its grips shake themselves loose?

Hong Kong warns air fryers can still pose the same health risks as traditional cooking methods

Hongkongers should be wary of marketing hype touting the health benefits of air fryers, the Consumer Council warned on Wednesday, noting that potentially cancer-causing compounds could still be created from preparing food with such products.